Design Guidelines
Macquarie University Property
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Ventilation

The design of Ventilation Systems are to be in accordance with relevant Australian Standards and the MQP Mechanical Design Standards.

 LINK TO MECHANICAL DESIGN STANDARD

The following components are to be assessed by the designer with consideration to individual space types.

Natural Ventilation

Natural ventilation refers to the use of un-treated outside air for ventilation and comfort purposes.

It can be mechanically assisted or passive, and is commonly used for common areas, atria, and in un-conditioned buildings. In some instances it is used to complement air conditioning systems, though careful consideration to the operation and practicality of this type of system should be employed in any design process to ensure that planned efficiency targets can be practically achieved.

Manually Openable Windows

Manually openable windows are operated by the occupants. Consider security, insects and sensors for air conditioning operation in any new design.

Manually Operated Louvers

Manually operated louvres are operated by the occupants. Consider security, insects and sensors for air conditioning operation in any new design.

Automatic Louvers

Automatic louvres may be employed to provide automation of naturally ventilated spaces. Careful consideration of moving parts, actuators and serviceability should be given in any new design. 

Supply Air

Supply air refers to conditioned air delivered into spaces. The conditioned air typically consists of an outside air and re-circulated air component.

Make Up Air

Make up air will be required to replenish exhaust either from general, fume cupboard or other exhaust systems. Consider varying flow rates and system control in any new design.

AS1668 Supply Rate

AS1668.2 dictates outside air supply rates for a variety of spaces. Apply relevant rate for each specific area type. Consider carbon dioxide monitoring and control to reduce outside air rates or air to air heat exchange for energy savings.

Exhaust

General Exhaust

General exhaust is provided as required for the different space type or storage type. Make up air may be via ducted mechanical system or via passive means (louvres, door grilles etc.). Consider acoustics when selecting make-up air path/means.

Kitchen Exhaust Hood

Kitchen exhaust systems may be required for commercial cooking applications. Refer to AS1668 for specific requirements. Consider additional active filtration (carbon, electrostatic) and odour removal (ozone injection) in any new design – particularly in proximity to other buildings/air intakes.

Consider use of un-conditioned make up air directly into kitchen via hood for improved efficiency. Kitchen air conditioning should be designed to minimize direct extraction of conditioned air.

Fume Exhaust

Fume exhaust is a localised exhaust system specifically designed for either fume cupboard or process application (e.g. extraction arm). Consider discharge locations and type of fumes when locating and treating outlets.

 LINK TO FUME CUPBOARD DESIGN STANDARD

Toilet Exhaust

Toilet exhaust is a general exhaust system for toilet areas.

Heat Removal

Heat removal may be required for specific processes. Consider temperature of exhaust flow when selecting equipment.

High and Low Level Exhaust

High and low level exhaust refers to the location of the inlet exhaust grilles in the space.

Low level exhaust may be used for situations when elements heavier than air are expected and may be considered a nuisance, asphyxiant or fire risk. Grilles should be within 300mm of the finished floor level. Consider nature of expected exhausted elements when selecting equipment.

High level exhaust may be used for situations when elements lighter than air are expected and may be considered a nuisance, asphyxiant or fire risk. Consider nature of expected exhausted elements when selecting equipment.

Smoke Exhaust (stage area)

Smoke exhaust may be required under BCA provisions or to meet requirements of a fire engineered strategy. Follow requirements from authority as specified. Consider short circuiting of smoke exhaust into outdoor air intakes when designing system and discharge locations.

Controls

CO2 Monitoring

CO2 monitoring may be employed to monitor CO2 levels in a space and adjust outside air levels accordingly to reduce energy consumption.